Capsule Coaching for All Leaders • PODCAST

 


 

Click here for Tony Mayo's podcastA quick message from an executive coach on the most important thing for leaders to learn and two things they must do.

Just click here to listen now or subscribe on your device using Apple’s Tunes, Android, and other podcatchers to have this and all new episodes placed on your device as they become available.

 

 


 

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The Values of Anger • PODCAST

 


Click here for Tony Mayo's podcastA quick message from an executive coach on how to get value from your anger.

Just click here to listen now or subscribe on your device using Apple’s Tunes, Android, and other podcatchers to have this and all new episodes placed on your device as they become available.


TRANSCRIPT:
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Shannon’s Limits: How A Genius Thinks, Works, and Lives

 


 

  1. Ignore more.
    • Inbox zero, be damned.
  2. Big picture first. Details later.
  3. Don’t just find a mentor. Allow yourself to be mentored.
    • Be humble enough to listen.
  4. You don’t have to ship everything.
    • Feel free to dabble & play.
      Not everything you make needs to ship. Some things you do for you.
  5. Chaos is okay.
  6. Time is the soil in which great ideas grow.
    • Stick with it & be willing to put it to the side now and then.
  7. Be mindful of with whom you spend time & at what activity.
  8. Money is a means not the end.
    • Good to have. Bad to chase.
  9. Fancy is easy. Simple is hard.
    • Simplification is an art form: it requires a knack for excising everything from a problem except what makes it interesting.
  10. The less marketing you need, the better your idea or product probably is.
    • Don’t oversell to the doubts and indifferent; put your energy into making something you find interesting.
  11. Value freedom over status.
    • Shannon, pursued projects that might have caused others embarrassment, engaged questions that seemed trivial or minor, then managed to wring the breakthroughs out of them.
  12. Don’t look for inspiration. Look for irritation. Then, do the work.

Source: 10,000 Hours With Claude Shannon: How A Genius Thinks, Works, and Lives

 

Also on this blog, Lessons from Bell Labs’ Heyday

 


 

Growing Beyond Control into Confidence • PODCAST


 

Click here for Tony Mayo's podcastThis short podcast describes an important step in the growth of business owners and other leaders, moving beyond the urge to control and micro-manage every action toward acting with confidence in your team and your own ability to respond to every eventuality.

 


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Improving Delegation

Delegation

Delegation: Let’s keep it simple.

  1. Find someone who will accept responsibility for the desired outcome.
  2. Explain that you do not have the time and/or expertise to design the solution.
  3. Ask the person to propose an approach which you have some confidence (not certainty) will succeed with the resources agreed to, e.g., hours, budget, tools, deadline, etc.
  4. Don’t abdicate, delegate: follow-up frequently on progress and impediments to show that you still value the outcome, perhaps using something like my progress report format.

“Give as few orders as possible,” his father Duke Leto had told him… once… long ago. “Once you’ve given orders on a subject, you must always give orders on that subject.”

Dune by Frank Herbert
p. 628 Penguin Publishing Group

Which tasks should you delegate? See this post, 3 Ds of Delegation

 


 

A Simple Habit That Can Boost Productivity

NASA-DC-9-cockpit


Repeat Back
&
Report Back

Here is a simple habit that can boost productivity in your organization. One client credits this technique for an 18% increase in annual revenue with a reduced headcount. It takes practice but quickly becomes second nature.

I brought this method into the workplace from my flight training. Pilots and air traffic controllers (ATC) must communicate precisely and briefly while also executing specialized tasks. Misunderstandings in aircraft can have horrible consequences, so specific communication techniques are required. Many of the most serious accidents are caused by failure to follow these practices, including the 1977’s Tenerife Airport Disaster, commercial aviation’s deadliest incident.

Talk may be cheap but miscommunication is costly.

Have you ever listened to the (more…)