Tony Mayo’s Blog: Tools, Techniques, & Thoughts

tony-mayo-photo

 

I use this blog to collect and make available some of my articles, insights, and guidance for the top executives I coach. My clients can easily find my best advice on goal setting, running meetings, stress reduction, and other topics important to anyone running a business. You can even learn how–and why–to meditate. I have videos, instructions, posters, and research results on this blog and a podcast on iTunes.

You are welcome to use all this in your work and to pass any of my posts along to your colleagues. I only ask that you preserve the attribution to me and not alter the content.

To contact me by telephone or email, click here for the “About Tony Mayo” page. A video that answers the most common questions asked by prospective clients is also available here..

_____________________

 

You can read what some of my clients have said
about my coaching by clicking here for “
Client Comments.”

_____________________

 

Click here to receive my free newsletter for business leaders.

 


 

Click here to send me a message.

 



Please support this blog.
Do all your Amazon shopping by
starting with this link
to Tony’s new book.

Search from here to find whatever
you want on Amazon.com.


 

 

Physical Distancing is Not a Guarantee

Physical Distancing is Not a Guarantee

☣   ☣   ☣

WHO & CDC recommendations for physical distancing A/K/A social distancing do not fully protect bystanders from a sneezing person who carries a viral infection, presumably including SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

Stay home!

☣   ☣   ☣

JAMA Insights
March 26, 2020
Turbulent Gas Clouds and Respiratory Pathogen Emissions
Potential Implications for Reducing Transmission of COVID-19

☣   ☣   ☣

 

Good luck, get plenty of sleep, & WASH YOUR HANDS!

Get more SARS-CoV-2 info for your business on this blog by clicking here.

 

COVID-19: Don’t Panic & Don’t Be Passive ☣ Prepare Your Business Now

COVID-19: Don’t Panic & Don’t Be Passive ☣ Prepare Your Business Now

What you need most right now and for the coming weeks isn’t alcohol wipes or N-95 masks. It is reliable information. The difficulties of obtaining it are examined thoroughly and frightfully here, in a broadcast from WNYC, On the Media | Covering a Pandemic: Epidemic Voyeurs No More

My top 3 recommendations.

#1: Rely on information directly from scientists and medical specialists.
Here are reliable sources:

#2: Get Ready NOW! (more…)

Coronavirus COVID-19: Protect Yourself & Others

Coronavirus COVID-19: Protect Yourself & Others

Basic Protective Measures

  • Maintain 4-6 feet of Physical Distance. Stay Socially Close.
  • Avoid touching your face: eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Stay home if you are tired, nauseated, feverish, or coughing.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with clean tissue or sleeve.
  • Clean knobs, handles, & switches daily.
  • Wash hands with soap and running water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Do not share towels. Label your own. Wash it every other day.
  • Replace shared towels with disposables.
  • Use only hand sanitizers with 60% or more alcohol.

(more…)

Coronavirus is coming to us. Is your business ready?

Coronavirus is coming to us. Is your business ready?

Tony wearing Face Mask RespiratorA global pandemic now seems inevitable.
Get ready!

You’ve no doubt heard the advice about handwashing and avoiding crowds in confined spaces: concerts, aircraft, conferences. I’d add, “Do everything you can –STARTING RIGHT NOW– to stay healthy and strong: adequate sleep, regular exercise, and good food (including weight control).”

 

Here’s one you may not have thought of:

The U.S. CDC recommends getting a flu vaccination.

The CDC has detailed guidelines for employers here:

 

In particular, I’d suggest:

  • Have a clear and well-communicated policy for various epidemic scenarios.
    • Step One: How will employees know whether to stay home?
    • How will you communicate your status to clients and vendors?
      How will they communicate their status to your business?
      For example, what if your cleaning service abandons you?
  • Implement “Work from Home” technology and policies. This should include:
    • A staggered schedule of “dry run” tests by every single employee who might need to work from home.
    • Plan and prepare projects that can be postponed until people are at home, so they have things to do in case their regular duties are exhausted or rendered unnecessary under the circumstances.
  • Make sure you have all essential positions filled. You don’t want to lose people to illness when you are already short-staffed.
  • Stock up now, before the rush, on hand sanitizers and face masks, including wipes for conference tables, telephone handsets, doorknobs, coffee machines, keyboards, etc.

Any other ideas?
Add yours to the comments below.

A Giant of Business Innovation’s Guidelines For a Good Life

First of all, RIP Clay Christensen. He did great work and set a fine example in many aspects of the way he lived. I may even forgive him for cultivating the Mormon Mafia at HBS, which spawned Bain Capital and other banes of business.

I am grateful to a client who recently shared this wonderful Harvard Business Review article with me, Managing Yourself | How Will You Measure Your Life? Here are some of my favorite excerpts with commentary.

I can relate to his insight from a meeting with Andrew Grove of Intel. It is what distinguishes coaching from what most consultants and advisors do, “instead of telling him what to think, I taught him how to think—and then he reached what I felt was the correct decision on his own.”

I also agree strongly with this, “Management is the most noble of professions if it’s practiced well. No other occupation offers as many ways to help others learn and grow, take responsibility and be recognized for achievement, and contribute to the success of a team.”

I can’t agree, however, that people become, “unhappy, divorced, and alienated from their children. [because they] implemented that strategy.” Individuals do not have total control over outcomes. He should remember the admonition, “If you want to make God laugh tell him your plans.” Stuff happens.

I agree that, “People who are driven to excel have this unconscious propensity to underinvest in their families and overinvest in their careers—even though intimate and loving relationships with their families are the most powerful and enduring source of happiness.”

I heartily endorse his version of, Culture eats strategy for breakfast. “Culture, in compelling but unspoken ways, dictates the proven, acceptable methods by which members of the group address recurrent problems. And culture defines the priority given to different types of problems. … Families have cultures, just as companies do. Those cultures can be built consciously or evolve inadvertently. … Like employees, children build self-esteem by doing things that are hard and learning what works.”

I could quibble with his interpretations of marginal cost analysis or humility but I endorse where he goes with even those loose premises. Rationalization and opportunism are corrosive. Healthy self-esteem improves learning, respect, & cooperation.

This quote sums it all up, “Don’t worry about the level of individual prominence you have achieved; worry about the individuals you have helped become better people.”

 


 

What Happens in the Brain When We Disagree


I happened to see this article, What Happens in the Brain When We Disagree, a few minutes after coaching a client on an important negotiation. The essence of what these scientists discovered by watching brain activity during a hypothetical real estate negotiation is, when people disagreed, their brains became less sensitive to the strength of others’ opinions.

(1) If we sense that the counterparty essentially agrees with our fundamental position we are able to logically consider their evidence, even if it contradicts our position.

(2) If we sense they disagree, our response is dominated by the fear-generating parts of the brain and we dig into a defensive, less logical posture.

This confirms the old adage, Start by establishing common ground, e.g., Philosopher Daniel Dennett on How to Argue.

How to compose a successful critical commentary: 

  1. You should attempt to re-express your target’s position so clearly, vividly, and fairly that your target says, “Thanks, I wish I’d thought of putting it that way.
  2. You should list any points of agreement (especially if they are not matters of general or widespread agreement).
  3. You should mention anything you have learned from your target.
  4. Only then are you permitted to say so much as a word of rebuttal or criticism.

 
Is there anything about human relations that has not been written thousands of years ago?

 

He that answereth a matter before he heareth it,
it is folly and shame unto him

Proverbs 18:13

 


 

Pitfalls of Assessment Tests

Pitfalls of Assessment Tests

 


 

This is exactly why I do not use standardized assessment tools on my executive coaching clients:

…one of the main hindrances to coaching was understanding people as collections of fixed properties with desire attached.

 

…by using assessment models this way we are reinforcing our understanding of people as things, and this way of understanding makes any effective coaching impossible or nearly so.

 

…it assumes that the person is a thing which can be found out about, figured out, and predicted.

–James Flaherty of New Ventures West
Chapter Six of Coaching: Evoking Excellence in Others (Third Edition)

Coaching: Evoking Excellence in Others

Executive Coach Provides Creative Solutions

 



Tony is my executive coach. Tony is an accomplished business expert and is always full of creative ideas. He is a true listener and can help you to come up with solutions that you never thought possible.

He is a true giver and would go out of his way to help people to get results from what they are doing. I would certainly recommend him if you want to improve your leadership skills and run your business more efficiently.

Esmael Dinan
Founder and CEO
Ofinno


 

Parasitic Strategies & How to Manage Ourselves

2 Ways of Life title .PNG

Enjoy this free sample of my novel, Crimes of Cunning.

In Chapter 15, Who Has the Helm, the main character learns about the childish tactics that persist into adulthood and sometimes take control of our actions. His wife also shares the counterintuitive response that takes away their power over us.

Click here to download the free .pdf. No registration, no pitch, just a gift. Read it and reap.

2 Ways of LIfe animated GIF