The ancient sages knew that the easy answers were the least useful. Executive coaches know that, too.

 


 

TRANSCRIPT: 
Hello, I’m Tony Mayo, The Business Owner’s Executive Coach. Thales of Miletus is generally considered the father of western philosophy. He’s also thought to be the very first scientist, perhaps the smartest person in the ancient world. A student once asked Thales two questions: “What is hard?”and “What is easy?” The sage responded, “What is hard is to know thyself.” “What is easy is to give advice.” And advice isn’t just easy to give. It’s very easy to deflect, devalue, disagree with. We do it almost reflexively. And that’s why the real value, the most important aspect of deep executive coaching, is helping clients to know themselves. What matters to them. What they’re capable of. What they really want. Sure, I’ve been in business for 40 years. I’ve seen a lot. I’ve tried a lot of things. I do give out advice. I’m not stingy with that. But that isn’t what _really_ makes the unique difference for clients. One of my clients put it beautifully. She said, “With Tony, I do my own best thinking.” And, that’s the way I want it. Another client said, “The biggest difference “after working with Tony for six months “is that I live in a different world. “When I go to the office, I see different things. “So, I take different actions and get better results.” “I’ve changed from going around “trying to fix what’s wrong with my company “to focusing on what’s possible in working toward that.” So, if you’re stuck, confused, upset, unsure, -particularly if it’s a familiar kind of stuckness- maybe even a “Groundhog Day” level of stuckness, don’t look for an easy answer, quick advice, a tip or a technique. Do the hard work. Look inside to who you are, what you can do, what you want, what’s really going to make a difference for the people you love. Yeah, it’s harder, but it lasts longer. Thanks for watching this video. I hope you enjoyed it, that you apply it, and share it.

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